Dove Lake and Cradle Mountain National Park

Resuming our tour of Tasmania’s wild and beautiful places after a break, here’s our walk around Dove Lake, under the ramparts of Cradle Mountain (map).

Tasmania is not very big, especially to Queenslanders like us, but Cradle Mountain is as hard to get to as Strahan, and for similar reasons: it’s at the end of several hours’ drive into wild country whether you start from Hobart or Launceston. Launceston is the closer of the two but the trip still takes a couple of hours – down the highway towards Burnie, then through Sheffield, past Mt Roland and up into the northern edge of the highlands. It’s worth the effort.

The entry-point to the park is a big new visitor centre with a carpark to match. Free shuttle buses run from it all day to Dove Lake, the end of their run, with stops at accommodation, walking tracks and the ranger centre.

We fitted the Dove Lake walk and two shorter walks (Enchanted and Waldheim) into the two long half-days we had there. Another day would have been nice, but I’ve already said that about several other places we saw, so I guess we really needed a longer holiday.

Dove Lake

The Dove Lake circuit is deservedly popular, being long enough to count as a ‘real’ walk but short enough to do in a day and without specialised gear. Continue reading “Dove Lake and Cradle Mountain National Park”

Friendly Beaches and other places near Freycinet

There aren’t many campervan sites on Freycinet Peninsula (previous post) and over-casual visitors are bumped out to free camping areas on the Friendly Beaches or near Moulting Lagoon, or to commercial van parks around Coles Bay. I therefore spent one night at each of the National Parks locations before heading North to Bicheno and then South again to the Three Thumbs and the Tasman Peninsula.

Moulting Lagoon

Lurking quietly between Coles Bay, Bicheno and Swansea is a large shallow estuarine area, a RAMSAR-proclaimed wetland and bird sanctuary. As Wikipedia says,

It comprises two adjacent and hydrologically continuous wetlands – Moulting Lagoon and the Apsley Marshes – at the head of Great Oyster Bay, near the base of the Freycinet Peninsula, between the towns of Swansea and Bicheno. Both components of the site are listed separately under the Ramsar Convention as wetlands of international significance. Moulting Lagoon is so named because it is a traditional moulting place for black swans.

Continue reading “Friendly Beaches and other places near Freycinet”

Freycinet National Park

The Freycinet Peninsula (map) is one of the most beautiful parts of Tasmania, which I think makes it one of the most beautiful parts of the world. Nearly all of the Peninsula, plus some nearby coastal areas, is National Park. There are access roads, camping grounds and day-use areas within the park but nothing else man-made apart from a network of walking tracks.

I admit that beauty is somewhat subjective but it’s hard to resist the claims of scenery like this:

Freycinet peaks
Freycinet from Honeymoon Bay
Hazards Bay beach view
Hazards Bay, Freycinet NP

Continue reading “Freycinet National Park”

Tasmania was beautiful last month

Russell Falls, Mt Field NP
Russell Falls, Mt Field NP

We spent most of the last month in Tasmania and it was beautiful.

That’s both a  reason for the recent gap in blog posts and a promise of what’s to come.

The plan is that this post will outline our trip and that subsequent posts will deal with particular places we visited, and that I will add links from this page to the new posts as I go.

That’s what I did with our Cobbold Gorge trip six months ago, and it seemed to work well then.

Continue reading “Tasmania was beautiful last month”

Undara wildlife

Fulfilling a promise I made soon after my visit to Undara Lava Tubes in Western Queensland in June, here are photos of the local wildlife. Like my collection of Cobbold Gorge wildlife photos, it was posted very late but has been back-dated to keep it with the other post from that visit.

As usual, clicking on the images will bring them up at full size in a lightbox and reveal a little extra information.

If you want more, this link will take you to a collection on iNaturalist of about 200 images by dozens of visitors to Undara.