Undara wildlife

Fulfilling a promise I made soon after my visit to Undara Lava Tubes in Western Queensland last winter, here are photos of the local wildlife. Better late than never, they say!

As usual, clicking on the images will bring them up at full size in a lightbox and reveal a little extra information.

Cobbold Gorge wildlife

This post fulfills a promise I made soon after my visit to Cobbold Gorge in Western Queensland. It was published many months late (sorry) but has been back-dated to keep it with the other posts from that trip.

Looking through my photos I found lots of birds, many of which we rarely see on the coast; quite a lot of insects, but all of them rather familiar; and not many reptiles, but only one which deserves to be featured here.

Freshwater crocodile
Freshwater crocodile downstream from the gorge

As usual, clicking on the images will bring them up at full size in a lightbox and reveal a little extra information.

Birds at Torrens Creek

Torrens Creek is a tiny town just to the west of White Mountains National Park and it’s a natural stopping point on a trip to Porcupine Gorge or White Mountains (or Rainsby, for that matter, although I haven’t been that way for a few years).

A pre-dinner ramble from the pub to the bore and beyond coincided with the birds’ sunset activity: a Crested Pigeon (Oxyphaps lophotes) on a power line was extremely dubious about something on the ground; a Magpie reckoned that the top of the bore was a great vantage point; and a Blue-faced Honeyeater in a bottlebrush tree was touched by golden evening light.

Crested Pigeon
Crested Pigeon

Continue reading “Birds at Torrens Creek”

Porcupine Gorge after the floods

My recent visit to White Mountains was an add-on to a longer visit to Porcupine Gorge, north of Hughenden. I’ve been to the Gorge several times before and wrote about the area at some length after my visit in April last year, covering the Gorge, its wildlife and nearby points of interest in three separate posts.

The main focus of this post, therefore, is the effect of the monsoonal floods early this year. Townsville was hit hard, but so was Western Queensland. The Flinders River had 50-year floods and was 200 kilometres wide at its peak; and the Flinders, of course runs from the Burra Range and the northern corner of White Mountains National Park through Hughenden to the Gulf, picking up the waters of Porcupine Creek on the way.

Continue reading “Porcupine Gorge after the floods”

Sawpit Gorge revisited


White Mountains National Park was named for the pale grey sandstone of its rugged hills and it earns its name even from space, as this satellite image  of its North-west corner shows. (The river at top left is the Flinders; this map puts it into context.) The whole of the park is difficult country; easy public access is restricted to the SE corner of it, where the highway between Pentland and Torrens Creek cuts across the park.

But for all its forbidding landscape it is a botanist’s paradise, Continue reading “Sawpit Gorge revisited”