Blencoe Falls in winter

I visited Blencoe Falls, inland from Kennedy, in December 2016 at the very end of the Dry Season. Friends have just been camping up there and shared photos of their trip so, with their permission, I thought I would share them more widely.

The creek is beautiful but there is not much more water coming over the falls than when I saw them, and one has to wonder how such a small stream could have carved out such an enormous channel.

blencoe creek
Blencoe Creek near the camping ground (photo: Claire F.)

Continue reading “Blencoe Falls in winter”

Alligator Creek to Cockatoo Creek

Alligator Creek picnic and camping area is a deservedly popular spot within Bowling Green Bay National Park.

In spite of the park’s name, the camping ground is well inland, on the upper reaches of the creek among the rugged hills of the Mount Elliot range. We have visited it a number of times over the years (this  link will take you to a 2012 post about it) but hadn’t ventured far beyond the immediate vicinity until exploring the track to Cockatoo Creek yesterday.

The track parallels the southern bank of the creek up into the hills. The first stop is the Lookout, Continue reading “Alligator Creek to Cockatoo Creek”

Blencoe Falls camping ground

I wrote recently about Blencoe Falls and the road to them but didn’t say much about the camping ground. The National Parks page provides all the basic information but didn’t make clear (to me, at least) that what is offered is basically free camping along a two-kilometre stretch of creek: when you drive into the nominal “camping ground”, all you find is an information shelter (under the dead tree) and a toilet in dry scrubland.

Blencoe Falls
Blencoe Falls camping ground

All the campers were settled down beside the creek, in shady sites well off the road. The creek itself was a tranquil string of broad pools linked by rocky shallows but the sandy, rock-strewn banks confirm the implication of the flood marker fifty metres back from the bridge, i.e. that it must sometimes be a raging torrent.

blencoe falls
Blencoe Creek from the bridge
blencoe falls
The flood height post, well back from the creek

I found plenty of wildlife beside the creek – lots of birds, including a Sea Eagle (they are not restricted to the coast), a cormorant, parrots and honeyeaters, and a good number of insects (now here, on my flickr photostream).

The most numerous animals, however, were flying foxes – there was a colony of hundreds or a few thousand just downstream from the bridge. They are Little Reds, a nomadic species, so they may not stay long, but they certainly made themselves known aurally and olfactorily during my visit and were an impressive sight as they swirled into the sky to go foraging at dusk.