Birds beside Rollingstone Creek

These bird photos were taken on a visit to Rollingstone Creek with Wildlife Queensland a month ago. That visit, like their other monthly expeditions, would normally be reported on the WQ branch blog but hasn’t appeared yet so I will give a little more detail than I usually do.

The location was Rollingstone Creek Bushy Park (Google Maps) and the broad, well vegetated creek bed beside it. Access to the park (part of which is a very quiet, pleasant camping ground) is from Balgal Beach Rd and the old low-level highway bridge, or from the Servo turn-off, north of the creek, and Rollingstone St.

We walked along the creek – very slowly, because there was so much to see – before returning for morning tea in the park. Most of the bird sightings were along the creek but the Bar-shouldered Dove, White-browed Robin and some others were seen in the park.

The dominant honeyeater in this well-watered strip of paperbark woodland was the Brown-backed, Ramsayornis modestus. It’s one I hardly see elsewhere, and I am gradually realising that each habitat favours one or two of our many (nearly thirty) honeyeater species above the rest: Lewin’s in the open woodland on Hervey’s Range, Blue-faced in my suburban garden, Brown in the mangroves of Sandy Crossing, Dusky along the rocky banks of Alligator Creek, and so on. Perhaps I should say ‘absorbing the fact’ rather than ‘realising’ because I’ve known it in theory for some years.

In addition to those pictured we saw a Striated Heron (Butorides striata), Yellow Honeyeater, Dusky Honeyeater, Peaceful Dove, Cuckoo-shrike (not sure which one), Forest Kingfisher, Mistletoebird, distant Pelicans and Crows, and many more; the full bird list was much longer than mine because I tend to forget about all the common birds as soon as I see them, unless they are doing something particularly noteworthy or pose for my camera.

Bonanza!

poplar gum flowers
Poplar gum flowers

Around this time every year our huge poplar gum bursts into flower, producing a bonanza for the birds which come from miles around to feast on its nectar. We delight in the display, too, even while we deal with the mess the tree and the birds make. Thousands of flowers pop their caps, which litter the lawn like miniature caltrops, then the rainbow lorikeets arrive to squawk and squabble, Continue reading “Bonanza!”

So many honeyeaters!

There is a bush block on Hervey’s Range which I visit regularly and often write about because its wildlife, large and small, continues to surprise me. (This link will take you to posts about previous visits.)

Last weekend’s special treat was a bottlebrush tree in full bloom, surrounded by enough honeyeaters to fill an aviary; all I had to do was stand nearby and point the camera at them Continue reading “So many honeyeaters!”

Blue-faced Honeyeater family

Blue-faced Honeyeater
Blue-faced Honeyeater family portrait

Young Blue-faced Honeyeaters, Entomyzon cyanotis, aren’t “blue-faced” at all: their cheeks change from brownish to yellow-green, and then to blue at maturity.

These three were part of a group of four or five moving around my garden in mid March – very likely a family group, in which case we’re looking at children perched above a parent.

Blue-faced Honeyeater
Immature Blue-faced Honeyeater

Fairy Gerygone and Lewin’s Honeyeater

I’m still finding creatures I can’t identify and having to call on my Friendly Local Experts for help. They are very generous with their time, and I thank them for their help, but I don’t want to embarrass them by getting anything wrong so they will remain Anonymous FLE’s (unless, of course, they read this and choose to be named). My latest call for help related to these little birds:

fairy gerygone
What’s smaller than a Brown Honeyeater?

Continue reading “Fairy Gerygone and Lewin’s Honeyeater”