Butterflies of Hervey’s Range

Winter may here, as I said in my last post, but the butterflies haven’t yet felt its full force. There are still plenty of flowers for the adults and greenery for the caterpillars, even on Hervey’s Range in Townsville’s cooler, drier hinterland.

These photos were taken on three successive visits between mid-April and mid-May and for this post I have simply sorted them by size: the female Varied Eggfly has a wingspan of about 85 mm, while the blues are in the 20 – 30 mm range.

Clicking on the images to see them in a lightbox will reveal extended captions including their Latin names.

Varied Eggfly
Female Varied Eggfly on snakeweed

Continue reading “Butterflies of Hervey’s Range”

Hervey’s Range after rain

Hervey's Range waterfall
The waterfall on Hervey’s Range Road in early March

The Townsville region received quite a deluge between mid February and early March, after a dry start to what we hoped would be a good Wet. Green Path recently posted photos of the Town Common after rain, and here are some from Hervey’s Range to the West of the city.

The waterfall photo above is the first chronologically. It was taken by Steve Coleman about March 5 Continue reading “Hervey’s Range after rain”

Aviary

My aviary is my garden, and a familiar bush block at Hervey’s Range, and anywhere else in the bush with birds. Who needs bars?

More seriously, this post is a collection of recent bird photos that I was pleased with but haven’t attached themselves to any particular story. The first shows a Drongo in my suburban garden and the rest were taken on two separate visits to Hervey’s Range. Continue reading “Aviary”

So many honeyeaters!

There is a bush block on Hervey’s Range which I visit regularly and often write about because its wildlife, large and small, continues to surprise me. (This link will take you to posts about previous visits.)

Last weekend’s special treat¬†was a bottlebrush tree in full bloom, surrounded by enough honeyeaters to fill an aviary; all I had to do was stand nearby and point the camera at them Continue reading “So many honeyeaters!”