Look at all that lovely water!

A visit to Kelso on Saturday gave me a chance to see Ross Dam, nearly full again after dropping steadily from this time last year until the last week of January.  The sign said it was at 85% but the number doesn’t have the same emotional impact as the view from the dam wall.

Ross Dam nearly full
Ross Dam, looking from the wall towards Toonpan and Barringha

It’s raining as I write, and the BOM is forecasting more rain in coming days – up to and including a possible cyclone – so it’s quite likely the dam will fill before the Wet season ends in about a month.

What we’ve had so far this year, according to the BoM, is about 600 mm since the last week of January.

What we would like, of course, is just enough rain, nicely spread out through the month. What we will get is, as always, unpredictable.

Wet-season skies

The thunderstorms of the last few days have given way to thick, rain-heavy clouds and intermittent rain and drizzle; no big downpours, but we’re going to get some good totals if it continues.

From Mundingburra, the view of Mt Stuart (584 metres) tells us what the weather is doing. Here’s the mountain this morning from Aplin’s Weir, with its transmission towers rising out of low cloud.

Mount stuart, Townsville, in low cloud
Ross River and Mount Stuart

Townsville’s weather in 2019 – what happened?

The last few days have brought us some genuine early-Wet weather: heat, humidity and thunderstorms. We have recorded our first double-digit rainfall totals in months, so it feels like a good time to see what really happened last year.

The BoM released its Annual Climate Statement for 2019 a fortnight ago. It named last year as Australia’s warmest and driest on record but there were notable local exceptions: Townsville (1761 mm) and the middle of Western Queensland scored their wettest year on record. (So did the tip of Cape York, one spot on the WA coast and one spot on the Tasmanian coast, which reinforces the feeling that our weather is getting ever crazier but is not otherwise relevant here.)

Continue reading “Townsville’s weather in 2019 – what happened?”

The joy of sprinklers

The Dry Season continues, and the birds are more and more grateful for our bird baths and lawn sprinklers – well, they seem to be, but who knows what’s going on in their little minds? All we can say for sure is that they come to fly through the spray or sit where the water is falling.

Spangled Drongo on mock orange
Sprinkled Spangled Drongo

Continue reading “The joy of sprinklers”

Jourama Falls in the Dry

jourama falls walking track
The walking track to Jourama Falls

On the way home from the trip which took me to the Dalrymple Track and elsewhere I stopped off at Jourama Falls. I didn’t walk up to the falls themselves because I saw from the creek – still flowing, but only just over the camping ground causeways – that the effort would not be well rewarded.

This photo, however, confirms just how dry the country is now.

Townsville is the same, but we know Townsville is in the Dry Tropics; Jourama is not far from Townsville, so we shouldn’t be too surprised that it’s dry; but both are drier than usual, and Cardwell, definitely in the Wet Tropics, was nearly as bad.