Dragonfruit in North Queensland

This post is little more than a footnote to my post about dragonfruit in Bali but I thought I would keep it separate.

We saw dragonfruit growing in a plot among mangoes down near Giru yesterday, the first we have seen growing here. There were far too many for domestic use or even a Cotters Market stall, so we assume the farmer supplies local greengrocers.

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Dragonfruit near Giru

We were with a long-time conservationist when we saw the plot and she was not at all happy about the plant, telling us that it had long been, and still was, a very serious environmental pest on Lady Elliot Island near Bundaberg. Continue reading “Dragonfruit in North Queensland”

Eco-Fiesta 2017

This year’s Eco-Fiesta, a few days ago, was much like those of previous years: a lovely day in the park with all sorts of loosely ‘greenie’ and ‘alternative’ people and organisations.  I wrote enough about the 2014 and 2013 events that I shouldn’t need to present an overview this time, so I will dive straight in to the things which caught my attention.

Wildlife Queensland had a well-staffed stall featuring a great gallery of flying fox photos. These animals get a bad press and need all the support they can get.

North Queensland Regional Plan had a very boring stall (I’m sorry, but it’s true!) which tried to engage visitors in planning for our region, the local government areas of Charters Towers, Burdekin Shire, Hinchinbrook Shire and Townsville. It’s a state government initiative and welcomes online input here. I told them about our declining rainfall. What’s your concern?

The Beekeepers had their usual displays of honey and hives, Continue reading “Eco-Fiesta 2017”

Reptiles on your plate: snakefruit and dragonfruit

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Fruit stall beside the path into Goa Gajah, Bali. From top: monkey bananas, dragonfruit and snakefruit, and mangosteens

We have recently returned from two weeks in Bali. They were enjoyable and interesting in many ways and part of the fun was discovering new food. Our favourite ‘new’ fruit, by far, was the snakefruit – ‘salak’ in the local language Continue reading “Reptiles on your plate: snakefruit and dragonfruit”

Tropical fruit in season in Townsville

We’re coming to the end of our Wet season (not that it was very wet!) and the local fruit supply reflects the change.

  • Mangoes have finished (sad face). I haven’t seen anyone selling them off the back of a ute for a couple of weeks, and I think the fruit we got in the last few weeks before that was from somewhere down south, not that the sellers said so. (The season starts in the NT in October and harvesting progresses south, reaching Townsville around Christmas.)
  • Custard apples are back in season (happy face). They were on sale at Cotters Market two weeks ago, and should be available for the next six months.
  • I picked the second of two Monstera fruit on my creeper a couple of days ago (happy face), after missing the ripening of the first (sad face) a fortnight ago.
  • My Ducasse bananas are flourishing (happy face). I have just picked a small bunch, two more bunches are fully formed but some months off ripening, and two more plants have just flowered.

Grey water – keeping gardens alive during water restrictions

Townsville is on Level 3 water restrictions as I write and is quite likely to be on Level 4  within a few months. If so, it’s very likely to stay on level 4 until we get our next Wet season.

Level 3 (sprinklers not to be used, handheld watering 6-7am and 6-7pm only, odds and evens applies to handheld watering) is tough enough on gardens – and gardeners – and Level 4 (no sprinklers or handheld watering allowed, watering cans/buckets only, odds and evens applies to watering cans/buckets) will be far worse. In these conditions, using grey water is one of the most significant options Continue reading “Grey water – keeping gardens alive during water restrictions”