Townsville’s 2018 Wet Season and what comes after

We’re officially in Winter now and I reckon we moved definitively into the Dry season a fortnight ago, so it’s worth looking back at the Wet and seeing what’s likely to happen to our water supply in the Dry.

Wet season rainfall and the year to come

Herveys Range rain radar
Here comes the rain! Hervey’s Range rain radar, 9.15 pm on Feb 20, 2018

BoM climate data reveals that our rainfall so far this year, Jan – Feb – Mar – April – May, was 118 – 285 – 343 – 10 – 2 mm, for a total of 760 mm.

Of that, 435 mm fell in the last week of February and the first two days of March when a rain depression was trapped over the city; an unusual but very welcome event which made the difference between another really  weak Wet and a nearly-average one. Continue reading “Townsville’s 2018 Wet Season and what comes after”

Festival 2018 Townsville

Festival 2018 seemed to come to us from nowhere and in retrospect we’re still not sure whether that was because we weren’t paying attention or because it was poorly publicised. In any case, it was a week of concerts, dance performances and public art in Queen’s Gardens and Strand Park, complementing the Townsville segment of the Commonwealth Games.

The concerts – some free, some not; some in the Spiegeltent, some in the open air – included The Idea of North (last here in 2006), the Grigoryan brothers, Archie Roach, local youth dance and circus groups, Townsville Guitar Orchestra and many more.

The Queens Gardens site was decorated with hundreds of hanging stars, very pretty at night, but the street art at Strand Park made better photos:

street art festival 2018 townsville Continue reading “Festival 2018 Townsville”

Are rainwater tanks useful in Townsville?

Townsville’s ongoing drought has encouraged many of us, especially the keen gardeners, to think seriously about bores, grey water systems and rainwater tanks. This post attempts to arrive at a credible answer to the first question we must ask about tanks: are they even useful?

We have been hearing from two schools of thought on the question for as long as we have been in Townsville, more than 25 years: “Yes, of course!” and “No! The dry season is so long and so dry that no tank will last through it.” One group must be wrong, and the only way to find out is to crunch a few numbers. Continue reading “Are rainwater tanks useful in Townsville?”

Townsville’s 2017 rainfall: no relief from dry conditions

As most of us have been expecting for a while now, Townsville’s 2017 rainfall total was on the low side. The BOM’s raw figures show that we had 791 mm for the year, well below our nominal average of 1135 mm.

I say “nominal” average because, as I said here almost two years ago, an average year is not normal: we get dry years (and 2017 is one of them) or wet years (e.g. 2007 – 2012) but rarely get a total resembling the average. Our 2016 total was 951 mm, which is close to average but still on the low side; adding these two years on to the end of the list of rainfall totals shows that we haven’t yet broken out of the succession of dry years which began in 2013.

What this has meant for our water supply is an ongoing crisis, with Ross Dam hovering around 15% of capacity most of the year, water restrictions at Level 3, and pumping from the Burdekin Dam always imminent even if not always under way. Our weak 2016-17 Wet hardly lifted the dam levels at all but an unseasonal May downpour (167 mm)  pushed the dam above 20% for the first time since August 2016.

Playing with the data so freely available online is fun, if sobering, and will show what’s going on better than another hundred words of text, so here’s the link to Townsville City Council’s dam levels page.

What the historical data can’t show, of course, is whether we’re going to get any decent rain in the coming months. Digging into the BOM climate outlook pages shows that they give us a 75% change of 300-400 mm in the next three months (which isn’t as much as we would like) but haven’t got a great deal of confidence in the accuracy of their prediction. “Wait and see” is all we can do.

Negotiating Christmas

Christmas can be a difficult time for anyone wishing to live ethically without offending family and friends by appearing to reject their goodwill. The frenzy of gift-giving is a big issue. On the one hand, Christmas has been commercialised beyond belief, becoming yet another pretext for blatantly wasteful over-consumption; on the other, giving is always a good thing (and receiving can be nice, too). The religious aspect may also be problematic, since the endless barrage of sentimentalised carols and nativity scenes is irrelevant at best, and may be oppressive, for atheists or members of non-Christian faith communities. And then there’s the obligatory socialising with co-workers, members of your sporting club, or those members of your extended family whom you do your best to avoid during the year. It has its good side but enough is enough, surely?

We can’t do much, individually, about the superfluity of Christianity or conviviality but we can certainly do something about the material waste. Continue reading “Negotiating Christmas”