National Day of Action 5 June

I don’t want to get too political here, but I do think we need to act to reduce climate change and the Greens’ National Day of Action on Sunday June 5 is one way of getting involved.
Even apart from that, recent Galaxy Poll results make fascinating reading in the light of the claims by some Opposition politicians to speak for ‘ordinary Australians’ in opposing action.
That’s enough politics for Bugblog for now. Back to the bugs soon.

Two climate warnings

Expert panels in Stockholm and Canberra recently issued major statements on climate within a few days of each other. Here are the essentials of both, with links to more detail.

Nobel Laureates Speak Out

Seventeen Nobel laureates who gathered in Stockholm published a remarkable memorandum asking for “fundamental transformation and innovation in all spheres and at all scales in order to stop and reverse global environmental change”. The Stockholm Memorandum concludes that we have entered a new geological era: the Anthropocene, where humanity has become the main driver of global change. Continue reading “Two climate warnings”

The Revenge of Gaia

In a universe long, long ago The Townsville Bulletin had a weekly books page independently edited by a staff journalist. I approached her about the possibility of doing some reviewing, and she was open-minded enough to give me the opportunity. She had no budget to pay me for my time but I got lots of free books and a completely (well, almost) open choice of what to review and how; I thought that was good enough and enjoyed the role for several years. This is an early example, with just a few words (the last one, for instance) changed now that there is no need to consider editorial proprieties.

It was added to Green Path in April 2020 but like some of my other reviews, it is published to the blog under its original date.

cover of The Revenge of GaiaThe Revenge of Gaia
James Lovelock
Penguin, 2007

The Revenge of Gaia was first published in England in early 2006 but Penguin have just released it here in a new, sensationalising, cover. In that eighteen-month interval we have seen the new IPCC report, the Stern Report and the beginnings of a political response. The (admittedly vigorous) legitimate debate that remains is over the extent of warming, and the best ways to slow and reverse the inevitable damage. In this context, The Revenge of Gaia is unhelpful: Lovelock presents such an overstated doom-and-gloom scenario that he undermines any emerging consensus.

Worse, though, is the illogicality of his proposals to mitigate the disaster he foresees. Continue reading “The Revenge of Gaia”